Lawn Diseases - Brown Patch

The symptoms of brown patch vary according to mowing height. In landscape situations, where mowing height is greater than 1", brown patch appears as roughly circular patches that are brown, tan, or yellow in color and range from 6" to several feet in diameter. The affected leaves typically remain upright, and lesions are evident on the leaves that are tan in color and irregular in shape with a dark brown border. When the leaves are wet or humidity is high, small amounts of gray cottony growth, called mycelium, may be seen growing amongst affected leaves. In close-cut turfgrasses (1" or less), brown patch develops in roughly circular patches, ranging from a few inches to several feet in diameter, that are brown or orange in color. Distinct foliar lesions are not visible and mycelium is typically not present, but a black or dark gray ring, called a smoke ring, may surround the brown patches. The smoke ring is evidence of active disease development and is only present when the turfgrass leaves are wet or humidity is near 100%.
Brown patch is most severe during extended periods of hot, humid weather. The disease can begin to develop when night temperatures exceed 60F, but is most severe when low and high temperatures are above 70F and 90F, respectively. The turfgrass leaves must be continuously wet for at least 10 to 12 hours for the brown patch fungus to infect. Poor soil drainage, lack of air movement, shade, cloudy weather, dew, over-watering, and watering in late afternoon favor prolonged leaf wetness and increased disease severity. Brown patch is particularly severe in turf that has been fertilized with excessive nitrogen. Inadequate levels of phosphorus and potassium also contribute to injury from this disease.
Lakeville MA
Mockingbird Hill
Tree and Lawn Care
Since 1987
508-947-6712